Course Descriptions
Engineering

The course numbering system is alphanumeric beginning with a four-letter department name followed by a dash, a three-digit course number, and a zero.  All courses are 3 credit hours unless otherwise indicated. Below are the four-letter subject codes for Engineering.

Acronyms
DSES  Decision Sciences and Engineering Systems
ECSE   Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering
MANE  Mechanical, Aeronautical, Nuclear, and Engineering Physics
MTLE  Materials Science and Engineering

Suffix Numbers
4000-4990  Courses open for credit to both advanced undergraduate and graduate students
5000-5990  Courses offered only at Rensselaer Hartford Campus for graduate credit
6000-6990  Courses designed for graduate credit
7000-7990  Courses offered only at Rensselaer Hartford Campus for graduate credit

Groton courses are scheduled term by term in consultation with students.


DSES  Decision Sciences and Engineering Systems

DSES-6070 Statistical Methods for Reliability Engineering
Statistical methods for the analysis of life-test, failure, or other durational data. Engineering applications are emphasized, but the methods are applicable to biometric, actuarial, and social science durational data. Included are basic reliability concepts and definitions; statistical life and failure distributions such as the exponential, gamma, Weibull, normal, lognormal, and extreme value; probability and hazard plotting techniques; maximum likelihood and other estimation methods. Prerequisite: DSES-6110.

DSES–6110 Introduction to Applied Statistics
A graduate course in basic statistics. It stresses common tasks such as summarizing large databases, making quick estimates, establishing relationships among variables, forecasting, and evaluating alternatives. Topics include probability; common, discrete, and continuous distributions; sampling; confidence intervals; hypothesis tests; contingency tables; statistical process control; and multiple regression analysis. It involves extensive use of computers for the analysis of data sets.
 

DSES-6230 Quality Control and Reliability
Topics include basic concepts of system and component reliability; statistical distributions such as the exponential, gamma, Weibull, and lognormal, important in the description of life and failure phenomena; and the graphical and quantitative analysis of complete and censored life-testing and failure data. Prerequisite: DSES-6110.

ECSE   Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering

ECSE–4440 Control Systems Engineering
Application of linear feedback theory to the analysis of large–scale, integrated control systems. Derivation of complex mathematical models of physical systems. Synthesis thesis of appropriate control laws to provide stability of these plants. Simulation of complex control systems on digital computers. Prerequisite: ECSE-4960.

ECSE–4490 Fundamentals of Robotics
A survey of the fundamental issues necessary for the design, analysis, control and implementation of robotic systems. The mathematical description of robot manipulators in terms of kinematics and dynamics. Hardware components of a typical robot arm. Path following, control, and sensing. Examples of several currently available manipulators. Electrical and Mechanical Engineering majors at Rensselaer in Troy have taken this course. Prerequisite: ECSE-2410.

ECSE–4500 Probability for Engineering Applications
Axioms of probability, joint and conditional probability, random variables, probability density and distribution functions, functions of random variables, statistical average, and Markov chains. Applications to such areas as sampling, reliability, statistical physics, and information theory. Prerequisite: ECSE-2410.

ECSE–4670 Computer Communication Networks
Problems, solutions, and limitations associated with interconnecting computers by communication networks. The seven layer ISO reference model of open systems interconnection (OSI) serves as a framework. Topics include: physical layer standards, data link protocols, queuing models, routing, satellite communications, local area networks, multiplexing, coding, and network configurations. Prerequisite: CISH–4010 or equivalent.

ECSE–4770 Computer Hardware Design
Digital design methodologies including timing chain and counter based "hardwired" microprogram design, modules, and modular design. The course bridges LSI and MSI design treating microprocessors, and I/O interfacing. Bus protocol standards, interrupts, direct memory access, priority arbitration, asynchronous timing, and overlap or double buffering. Specific examples of design include controllers for disks, Cassettes, video systems, and stepping motors. Course includes a laboratory with access to LSI-11 and M6800 microprocessors. Prerequisite: ECSE-2610 or CISH-4030.

ESCE-4960 Fundamentals of Signals and Systems
(Formerly ECSE-4960-Linear Systems Analysis)
This course delivers a comprehensive introduction to continuous- and discrete-time signals and systems. The extensive use of MATLAB in the course is intended to develop the fluency required for graduate level engineering courses. Material covered includes time- and frequency-domain representation of continuous- and discrete-time signals. Time-domain analysis of continuous and discrete-time systems. Laplace transform and its use in the analysis of continuous-time systems. Transfer function, poles and zeros. Continuous Fourier series and transform. Discrete Fourier transforms. Sampling and aliasing. Frequency domain analysis of continuous and discrete-time systems. Frequency response of the systems and filter concepts. Discrete-time system analysis using the z transform. Introduction to Digital filters.

ECSE–5010 Instrumentation and Measurement
Complete survey of current instrumentation technology. Mathematical development of ideal first and second order instruments. Expands to cover temperature, pressure, flow, and motion measurements. Basic measurement statistical and error analysis techniques. Prerequisite: ECSE-4960.

ECSE–6050 Advanced Electronic Circuits
Design and analysis of wideband amplifiers, differential amplifiers, and operational amplifiers; the characteristics of op-amps and their use as linear and non-linear elements, including compensation techniques; regulated power supplies. Prerequisite: ECSE-2050 or an undergraduate course in analog electronics.

ECSE–6400 Systems Analysis Techniques
Methods of analysis for continuous and discrete–time linear systems. Convolution, classical solution of dynamic equations, transforms, and matrices. Emphasis on the concept of state space. Linear spaces concept of state, modes, controllability, observability, state transition matrix. State variable feedback, compensation, decoupling. Prerequisite: ECSE-4960.

ECSE–6410 Robotics and Automation Systems
Methods of design and operation of general purpose and industrial manipulator systems. Kinematic and dynamic models of mechanical arms. Arm control through coordinate transformations, feedback, and microcomputers. Hardware components. Computer software and languages. Robotic vision and sensors. A unified theory for hierarchically intelligent control, and its application to advanced automation and to the industry of the future. Prerequisites: ECSE-6400, ECSE-4490 desirable.

ECSE–6420 Nonlinear Control Systems
Phenomena peculiar to nonlinear systems. Linearization, iteration, and perturbation procedures. Describing function stability analysis. Phase plane methods. Poincare's theorems. Relaxation oscillations and limit cycles. Stability analysis by Lyapunov's method. Popov's theorem. Prerequisite: ECSE-6400.

ECSE–6440 Optimal Control Theory
Optimal control from the Calculus of Variations point of view. Continuous and discrete variational calculus, discrete and continuous minimum principle. Other topics include: singular control, minimum fuel problems, numerical methods for non–linear optimal control, solutions to Riccati equations, sensitivity in optimal control, and observers. Prerequisite: ECSE–6400.

ECSE–6460 Multivariable Control Systems
Advanced course in the synthesis and analysis of linear multivariable control systems. Topics include: output feedback, reduced–order modeling and control, disturbance accommodation and counteraction pole–zero relocation via feedback, decoupling, vector frequency domain methods, decentralized control, numerical methods for controller syntheses. Emphasizes contemporary approaches to feedback controller design and connections between time and frequency domain methods. Material from technical journals and textbooks. Computer design problems. Prerequisite: ECSE–6400 and ECSE-6440.

ECSE-6510 Introduction to Stochastic Signals and Systems
Deterministic signal representations and analysis, introduction to random processes and spectral analysis, correlation function and power spectral density of stationary processes, noise mechanisms, the Gaussian and Poisson processes. Markov processes, the analysis of linear and nonlinear systems with random inputs, stochastic signal representations, orthogonal expansions, the Karhunen-Loeve series, channel characterization, introduction to signal detection, linear mean-square filtering, the orthogonality principle, optimum Wiener and Kalman filtering, modulation theory, and systems analysis. Prerequisite: ECSE-4960, undergraduate course in Probability.

ECSE–6560 Digital Communications Engineering
Functional characterization of digital signals and transmission facilities, band–limited and duration–limited signals, modulation and demodulation techniques for digital signals, error probability, intersymbol interference and its effects, equalization and optimization of baseband binary and M–ary signaling systems, error control coding techniques, digital filtering current practices in modern design. Introduction to communication networks and switched systems, store–and–forward communication systems, broadband communication techniques, channel protocol, current developments in digital communication systems design and operation. Prerequisite: ECSE-6510.

ECSE–6590 Principles of Wireless Communications
Course presents a unified treatment of all wireless networks -- from cellular, WLANs to 3G. Principles of air interface design are covered which include characterization of the wireless channel, transmission techniques for the PHY layer, and multiple access alternatives applied to wireless networks. Wireless network design fundamentals including channel allocation techniques, cellular concepts, architectural methods used for expansion of the network, mobility management, radio resources and power management. Implementation of cellular telephone and mobile data networks based on TDMA/GSM and CDMA technologies. Wideband local access technologies: EEE 802.11 WLAN standards. Discussion of developments towards IMT-2000 3G standards, including W-CDMA and CDMA2000. Prerequisites: ECSE-6510 or ECSE-6560 and ECSE-4670.

ECSE–6620 Digital Signal Processing
Comprehensive treatment of the theory, design, and implementation of digital signal processing structures. Sampling, quantization and reconstruction process. Design of digital filters in both time and frequency domains. Analysis of finite word length effects. Theory and applications of discrete Fourier transforms and the FFT algorithm. Applications from the communication, control, and radar signal processing areas.
Prerequisite: ECSE-4960.

ECSE–6630 Digital Image and Video Processing
Theory of multidimensional signal processing and its application to digital image and video processing. The first half will cover signals and systems, Fourier transform, z-transform, discrete Fourier transform, FIR and IIR filters and their design. The emphasis will be on the unexpected and important differences from the one-dimensional case. The second half consists of applications in image and video signal processing, e.g., compression coding, noise reduction, motion estimation, deblurring, and restoration. Prerequisites: ECSE-6620.

ECSE–6660 Broadband and Multimedia Networking
Review of fundamental concepts and protocols for broadband and multimedia networking. The course addresses various traffic management techniques for providing QoS in ubiquitous TCP/IP networks. These include traffic classification and conditioning, packet scheduling, buffer management, and congestion control. Both differential services and integrated services models of the Internet are discussed. Multi Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) as the next generation QoS enabled network platform is then presented. The course provides detailed coverage of Internet multimedia protocol architecture that supports real-time delivery of multimedia information. Protocols for real-time interactive applications are considered in detail, including RTP, RTCP and SIP including SIP based implementation of Voice over IP telephony (VoIP). The course concludes with the study of ATM networks and technology options for broadband access and transport. Prerequisite: ECSE-4670, ECSE-6510.

ECSE–6770 Software Engineering I
Engineering approach to the development of large programming projects. Successive steps of requirements analysis, specification, design (e.g., –down modularization), coding (e.g., structured programming), debugging, testing, maintenance, and thorough documentation, as illustrated by examples and papers from current literature. Team project is required. Prerequisites: CISH-4020.

ECSE–6780 Software Engineering II
(Continuation of ECSE–6770)
Current techniques in software engineering with topics selected from portability, security, public key cryptosystems, legal protection of software, reliable software, management of large projects, charging for computing resources, and source–to–source transformations for optimization. Prerequisite: ECSE–6770.

ECSE–6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering

ECSE–6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering
Applied Digital Signal Processing
DSP chip architecture. Implementing signal processing algorithms on a DSP chip; Fixed point implementations and DSP programming. DSP software development tools, code optimization. Take several algorithms from a high level implementation such as MATLAB to a low level implementation on a DSP chip using C programming. Students will complete a design project(s) on a commercially available DSP board. Prerequisites: ECSE-6620, knowledge of C language and MATLAB programming is required.

ECSE–6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering
Cryptography and Network Security
Principles of number theory and the practice of network security and cryptographic algorithms. Topics include: Primes, random numbers, modular arithmetic and discrete logarithms. Conventional or symmetric encryption (DES, IDEA, Blowfish, Twofish, Rijndael) and public key or asymmetric encryption (RSA, Diffie-Hellman), hash functions (MD5, SHA1, RIPEMD-160, HMAC), digital signatures, certificates and authentication protocols (X.509, DSS, Kerberos), electronic mail security (PGP, S/MIME), web security and protocols for secure electronic commerce (IPSec, SSL, TLS, SET). Prerequisite: ECSE-4670 or permission of the instructor.

ECSE–6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering
Embedded Digital Control Systems
Course focuses on the design of an embedded digital controller that can be relied upon in situations where the systems's response to external events must be both timely and accurate in real time. The course will cover the following:
(i) Design of a digital controller and its implementation as a real time system using lab equipment (microcontrollers, Lap Pack) and embedded Linux or a commercial available Real Time Operating System (RTOS).
(ii) Development of digital controllers (using finite states) to control systems with discrete states or discrete operating modes. Modeling of systems will be done on examples from industries such as automotive, chemical, communication and robotics.
(iii)Interaction and cooperation of analog and digital systems. Design of fail-safe systems for use in safety-critical situations. Prerequisite: ECSE-2410; ECSE-4440 desirable.

ECSE–6960 Topics in Electrical Engineering
Mechatronics
Mechatronics, as an engineering discipline, is the synergistic combination of mechanical engineering, electronics, control engineering, and computers, all integrated through the design process. It involves the application of complex decision making to the operation of physical systems. Mechatronic systems depend on computer software for their unique functionality. This course studies mechatronics at a theoretical and practical level; balance between theory/analysis and hardware implementation is emphasized; emphasis is placed on physical understanding rather than on mathematical formalities. A case-study, problem-solving approach, with hardware demonstrations, either on video or in class, and hardware lab exercises, is used throughout the course. This covers mechatronic system design, modeling and analysis of dynamic physical systems, control sensors and actuators, analog and digital control electronics, continuous controller design and digital implementation, interfacing sensors and actuators to a microcomputer/microcontroller, and real-time programming for control. These are the fundamental areas of technology on which successful mechatronic designs are based. Throughout the coverage the focus is kept on the role of each of these areas in the overall design process and how these key areas are integrated into a successful mechatronic systems design. The course involves 12 weeks of lectures and 6 lab sessions. Prerequisite: ECSE-4960 or equivalent.

ECSE-6960 Nuclear Power Engineering
Basic plant cycles of PWR and BWR systems, overview of basic radiation and fission process, neutron life cycle and six-factor formula, reactivity and startup rate, reactivity coefficients, fuel and poison loading, delayed neutrons, reactor startup and shutdown, decay heat, overview of heat transfer and fluid flow including natural circulation, reactivity control, reactor protection, print reading (Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams, Electrical Diagrams, Control Wiring Diagrams, and Logic Diagrams), Electrical Distribution and emergency responses (plant trip, loss of offsite power, and safety injection actuation), motor controllers, specified electrical requirements (10CFR, submitted plant design, Technical Specifications, Abnormal and Emergency Operating Procedures), process instrumentation, nuclear instrumentation, Appendix R (Fire Safety and Safe Shutdown) electrical requirements. Prerequisites: Undergraduate degree in electrical engineering or electrical power engineering recommended.

ECSE–6980 Master's Project in Electrical Engineering
Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 3 to 6 credit hours

ECSE–6990 Master's Thesis in Electrical Engineering
Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 6 credit hours

ECSE–7010 Optical Fiber Communications
Review of the state–of–the–art in optical fibers, light sources, and photodetectors. Topics include: propagation, coupling, dispersion, loss and cut off characteristics of guided wave models in optical fibers, structural and operating parameters of various types of hetrostructure lasers and light–emitting diodes and quantum efficiency, response time and noise characteristics of silicon PAD and PIN diodes. Digital and analog transmission over optical fibers.  DWDM systems. Optical amplifiers.  Optical networks. Prerequisite: ECSE-4500 or equivalent. ECSE-6560 desirable.

ECSE–7100 Real–Time Programming and Applications
Hardware and software characteristics of real–time systems for analysis and control. Real–time programming techniques, standard interfaces and busses, sensors, data smoothing, digital filtering, and digital control. Prerequisite: CISH–4030 (or ECSE–4730) and CSCI–4210.

MANE  Mechanical, Aeronautical, Nuclear, and Engineering Physics

MANE–4240 Introduction to Finite Elements
Introductory course in the Finite Element Method (FEM) beginning with the "direct method" for discrete systems such as springs, trusses, elastic frames, and pipe networks. FEM is then applied to continua, considering one dimensional problems in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and elasticity using variational and weighted residual methods. Algorithms for the construction and solution of the governing equations.

MANE–4610 Vibrations
Free and forced linear vibrations of damped and undamped mechanical and electrical systems of n degrees of freedom. Continuous system vibration. Manual and computer methods of finding natural frequencies. Self– and nonself–adjoint problems. Eigenfunction expansion. Integral transforms. Methods of approximating natural frequencies. Rayleigh, Rayleigh–Ritz, Ritz–Galerkion, Stodola, Holzer, Myklestad matrix iteration. Perturbation techniques. Stability criteria.

MANE–4650 Fracture Mechanics
Mechanics aspect of failure, fracture, and fatigue. Brittle fracture criteria. Linear elastic fracture methods. Stress fields around cracks. Statistical aspects of fatigue. Cumulative damage. Contact fatigue. Prerequisite: MANE-4320.

MANE–4800 Boundary Layers and Heat Transfer
Navier–Stokes equations and boundary layer approximations. Exact solutions and integral methods for incompressible boundary layers. Transition; turbulence. Convective heat transfer in laminar and turbulent flow. Special problems at high temperature.

MANE–5000 Advanced Engineering Mathematics I
A presentation of mathematical methods useful in engineering practice. The course covers analytical and numerical techniques used in linear algebra, the numerical solution of nonlinear equations, the foundations of vector and tensor algebra and an introduction to vector operators. Also covered are methods of polynomial and trigonometric interpolation and approximation, numerical solution methods for initial and boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations and an overview of the fundamentals of probability and statistics including random variables, density and distribution functions and hypothesis testing. Symbolic manipulation and scientific computation software used extensively. Emphasis on reliable computing is made throughout.

MANE–5060 Introduction to Compressible Flow
One–dimensional isentropic compressible flow. Normal stationary and moving shock waves. Design on inlet and ducted diffusers, steady flow wind tunnels and shock tubes. Flow in ducts with friction and heat transfer.

MANE–5080 Turbomachinery
Representation of performance of turbomachines; mechanism of energy transfer; factors limiting design and performance including surge, choking, and cavitation; two– and three–dimensional flow phenomena; performance analysis including multistage effects and off–design performance.

MANE–5100 Mechanical Engineering Foundations I
A presentation of the principles of macroscopic transport useful in the analysis of mechanical engineering systems. The course covers the formulation energy mass and momentum balances in continua; the development of mathematical models of heat conduction and mass diffusion in solids and of flow in ideal and Newtonian fluids. Models are illustrated using examples from mechanical engineering. Particular attention throughout is devoted to the development of the ability to create realistic and reliable models.

MANE–6180 Mechanics of Composite Materials
Mechanics of elastic heterogeneous solids and thermoplastic behavior. Mechanics of distributed damage. Mechanical behavior.

MANE–6200 Plates and Shells
Preliminaries on linear, three–dimensional elasticity theory. Reduction of the elasticity theory to the theories of plates and shells. Anisotropy. Nonlinear theories. Applications.

MANE-6410 Celestial Mechanics
Introduction to celestial mechanics, orbits, and perturbations, exterior ballistics, powered flight trajectories, space flight trajectories.

MANE-6420 Multibody Dynamics
Analytical and numerical analysis of dynamic behavior of multibody mechanical systems. Emphasis on understanding all aspects of modeling and analysis process associated with real (spacecraft, automotive, biomechanical, etc.) systems. Review of traditional dynamic analysis methods (Newtonian-Euler, Lagrange, etc.), presentation of more efficient, powerful, recently developed methods (including Kane's method). Comparison of the different formulations and their applicability to computer simulation. Treatment of constraints, extraction of data from equations of motion, and computational issues.

MANE-6490 Plasticity
Stress invariants. Polyaxial stress-strain relation for strain-hardening materials. Ideal plasticity, various yield conditions and associated flow rules. Variational principles. Limit analysis. Applications in elastic-plastic stress analysis, metal forming, plastic collapse, and plastic instability.

MANE–6530 Turbulence
Navier–Stokes and energy equations, exact solution, weighted residuals methods, linearized viscous flow, inner and outer solutions, boundary layer theory, existence and uniqueness, higher order approximations, transition, mathematical models of turbulent flow, applications. Prerequisite: MANE–4800 or equivalent.

MANE–6540 Advanced Thermodynamics
Review of the first and second laws. Criteria of equilibrium. Auxiliary functions and general thermodynamic relations. Thermodynamic properties. Chemical equilibrium. Availability and irreversibility.

MANE–6550 Theory of Compressible Flow
General equations of compressible flow. Specialization to inviscid flows in two space dimensions. Linearized solutions in subsonic and supersonic flow. Characteristic equations for supersonic flow with applications in external and internal flow. One dimensional non–steady compressible flow.

MANE–6630 Conduction Heat Transfer
Analytical, finite difference and finite element solutions of steady and transient heat conduction problems. Illustrated with applications from engineering practice.

MANE–6640 Radiation Heat Transfer
Introduction to radiation heat transfer in diathermanous media and participating media. Selected applications from spacecraft design, furnace design, meteorology, temperature measurement, environmental control.

MANE–6650 Convective Heat Transfer
Fundamental study of convection heat transfer in laminar and turbulent, internal and external flows. Unsteady flows, combined heat and mass transfer, conjugated unsteady heat transfer and buoyancy induced convection. Selected applications from aeronautics and heat exchanger design. Prerequisite: MANE–4800 or equivalent.

MANE-6720 Computational Fluid Dynamics
Course focuses on computational approaches to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. Course assumes knowledge of numerical methods and therefore directly attacks the obstacles to applying these methods to the Navier-Stokes equations. Issues concerning implementation of finite difference methods (FDM), finite volume methods (FVM) and finite element methods (FEM) will be discussed. These issues include: the discrete formulation, non-linear equation iterator (steady)/marcher(time-accurate), linear equation formation, boundary condition prescription and linear equation solution. Prerequisite: MANE-6660 or equivalent.

MANE-6830 Combustion
Review of fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, fluid mechanics, and modern diagnostics. Discussion of flame propagation, thermal and chain explosions, stirred reactors, detonations, droplet combustion, and turbulent jet flames. Introduction to computational tools for complex equilibrium and kinetic calculations. Applications to problems such as pollutant formation. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

MANE-6840 An Introduction to Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer I
This course is intended to give students a state-of-the-art understanding about single and multicomponent boiling and condensation heat transfer phenomena. Applications include the analysis of nuclear reactors, oil wells, and chemical process equipment. Student satisfactorily completing this course are expected to thoroughly understand the current thermal-hydraulics literature on multiphase heat and mass transfer and be able to conduct independent research in this field. Prerequisite: A working knowledge of fluid mechanics and heat transfer.

MANE–6960 Topics in Mechanical Engineering

MANE–6960 Advanced Fracture Mechanics
This course covers Linear and Non-linear Fracture Mechanics. The following are the course topics: Tensor Analysis, Stress, Strain, Equilibrium, Compatibility, Constitutive equations. Theory of elasticity solutions for a cracked body, Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM), Energetics of cracked bodies, The J integral, Plastic zones, Fracture Toughness and R curve analysis, Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPRM), Dugdale-Barenblatt and Bilby-Cottrell-Swinden (BCS) solutions using yield strips, Hult-McClintock solutions, Hutchinson-Rice-Rosengren (HRR) solutions, Slip-line solutions, Engineering approach to elastic-plastic fracture, J integral testing, J controlled crack growth, Computational methods for elastic-plastic fracture.

MANE–6960 Topics in Mechanical Engineering:
Mechatronics
Mechatronics, as an engineering discipline, is the synergistic combination of mechanical engineering, electronics, control engineering, and computers, all integrated through the design process. It involves the application of complex decision making to the operation of physical systems. Mechatronic systems depend on computer software for their unique functionality. This course studies mechatronics at a theoretical and practical level; balance between theory/analysis and hardware implementation is emphasized; emphasis is placed on physical understanding rather than on mathematical formalities. A case-study, problem-solving approach, with hardware demonstrations, either on video or in class, and hardware lab exercises, is used throughout the course. This covers mechatronic system design, modeling and analysis of dynamic physical systems, control sensors and actuators, analog and digital control electronics, continuous controller design and digital implementation, interfacing sensors and actuators to a microcomputer/microcontroller, and real-time programming for control. These are the fundamental areas of technology on which successful mechatronic designs are based. Throughout the coverage the focus is kept on the role of each of these areas in the overall design process and how these key areas are integrated into a successful mechatronic systems design. The course involves 12 weeks of lectures and 6 lab sessions. Students will need a laptop computer for lab session. Students who have previously taken MANE 4490, 4250, or Sensors and Actuators are not eligible to take this course for credit.

MANE–6960 Advanced Topics in Finite Element Methods
The basic concepts of the finite element method are developed. Direct, Galerkin and variational approaches to element formulations are emphasized. Although the procedures presented are general, the majority of examples and special topics are from solid mechanics including two and three dimensional elasticity, plate banding and shells. In addition to the fundamentals of finite element, the student will be exposed to the analysis of example problems.

MANE–6960 Topics in Mechanical Engineering:
Modeling and Analysis of Machining Systems

A hands-on exposure to modeling, analysis, and simulation methodologies applicable to the investigation of the efficiency of metal machining systems. Topics covered include the physical principles of metal chip forming processes, thermo mechanical finite element analysis of metal cutting processes, materials science modeling, machine tool path simulation modeling, machine tool vibration dynamics, machine shop scheduling and sequencing, discrete event simulation, and economic modeling of machining systems and processes. Students working in teams and individually will develop expertise in selected modeling techniques by carrying out term-long research projects.

MANE–6980 Master's Project in Mechanical Engineering
Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 3–6 credits

MANE–6990 Master's Thesis in Mechanical Engineering
Details may be obtained from the Department of Engineering and Science. 6 credits

MANE-7000 Advanced Engineering Mathematics II
A continuation of the advanced presentation of mathematical methods useful in engineering practice. The course covers the Frobenius method for the solution of boundary value problems; the representation of arbitrary functions by characteristic functions; calculus of functions of more than one variable including the study of extreme; overview of calculus of variations; principles of vector and tensor analysis; analytical and numerical techniques for the solution of initial and boundary value problems in partial differential equations. Symbolic manipulation and scientific computation software used extensively. Emphasis on reliable computing is made throughout.

MANE–7100 Mechanical Engineering Foundations II
A presentation of the most common physical and mathematical modes used in the description of the mechanical behavior of materials. The course covers the microstructural and thermodynamic foundations of constitutive material behavior of interest in mechanical engineering applications; overview of elasticity and plasticity and their relationship to microstructural features; principles of rheology; viscoelasticity and creep; failure mechanisms including fracture crack propagation and fatigue crack growth. Particular attention throughout is given to the development of the ability to utilize the mathematical models to assess the reliability and life of mechanical engineering components at the design state.

MTLE  Materials Science and Engineering

MTLE–4260 High-Temperature Alloys
Basic characteristics of nickel, cobalt, and iron-base superalloys, and refractory metals such as columbium, tantalum, tungsten, and molybdenum for gas turbine, steam turbine, and space power applications. Characterization of systems, relationship of mechanical properties to microstructure, processing by casting and working, joining and heat treatment, oxidation and protection of alloys, applications and future trends, invited lectures.

MTLE–6960 Topics in Materials Engineering

MTLE–6960 Topics in Materials Engineering:
Creep and Fatigue of Metals

A presentation of mechanical behavior and metallurgical phenomena encountered at high and intermediate temperatures and also under cyclic loading conditions. The course discusses measurement and testing of creep and fatigue, description of micro structural processes, data presentation and scatter, design aspects, instabilities and the parametric representation of creep-rupture data.

MTLE-6960 Topics in Materials Engineering:
Intermediate Temperature Degradation and Protection

A course about protection against degradation of materials exposed to many industrial environments including gas turbine engines in the intermediate temperature range. It builds on High Temperature Coatings Engineering, previously offered. Tribological phenomena such as Friction, Wear, Erosion, and Impact will be addressed in practical as well as theoretical terms. Interaction of the tribological processes with foreign materials deposition, and resulting corrosion and oxidation will also, be highlighted. Protection against degradation by the above phenomena will be covered. These will include surface treatments, lubrication, and wear and erosion coatings.

MTLE–6960 Topics in Materials Engineering:
Light Metal Alloys

Concentrates on aluminum, magnesium, and titanium with fully half of the course devoted to titanium. Production of alloys, fabrication, properties, and microstructure, corrosion resistance, and more are covered. Emphasis on the use of alloys of all three light metals in engineering applications. Textbooks available on titanium and on light metal alloys in general.

MTLE–696x High-Temperature Coatings Engineering
Background and working knowledge about the oxidation and hot corrosion behavior of high-temperature materials (primarily nickel-cobalt-and iron-based alloys and the protective coatings for application from about 1000F to 2200F. The course includes detailed discussion of types of coating, processing methods, characterization, properties, and evaluation techniques. Upon completion of this course a student will have a familiarity with and be able to make informed judgments on the selection of coatings for high-temperature service.

MTLE–7061 Casting and Joining Processes
Principles of melting, pouring, and solidification. Types of casting processes. Mold design and materials. Design for casting. Welding, diffusion bonding, brazing, and soldering. Adhesive and mechanical fasteners. Principles of joining. Design for welding.

 

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Updated: 2016-05-16, 15:33